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to building bridges between the united states and the arab and muslim world, particularly libya. and i think this is going to sour a lot of americans about the future trajectory of the middle east, about the direction in which the arab spring is headed. and i think particularly this is tragic for syrians. syrians who are now under siege or around 20,000 syrians have been killed by the regime of assad and i think many syrians were hoping for an outside intervention or outside aid to provide some type of save zones. and i think the reality is that after the united states and nato had gone into libya it oust gadhafi, i think there will be far less appetite to want on do anything in syria. >> probably also raises huge questions about money from america that is going to fund some of these governments particularly in egypt where it's $1.5 billion plus another billion that was being put together in a package right now. how do you think that plays out in congress at this point? >> that's absolutely right. egypt is a country which has i think the second or third largest aid package from the united st
penetrated than the united states. there is a big opportunity. >> to that point i can tell you foreign policy jon fortt who is inside there, tim cook is showing a video of the barcelona store opening now saying they have 380 stores in 12 countries, 13th country sweden is coming. 1 million people around the world using apple's products. peter, apart from the iphone 5, what else will move the stock here? >> be interesting to see if there's anything along the lines of -- well, we know they'll talk about a facebook integration. we don't expect to hear much about music and tv and movies. if there is much there, that will be an interesting surprise as well. john barr, you've clearly got skin in the game. let me tell you now, more news coming from tim cook. he's talking about the recent mac updates, including mountain lion. he says apple notebook is now number one in market share in the united states over the last three months at 27%. that probably won't surprise you. what do you want to hear, here on in? >> we've been long term investors in apple due to their ability to generate great new products.
to us by the congress of the united states which represents the american people. >> what does that mean in terms of numbers? >> 2% growth. >> are we at two? kevin was very careful, he went 1.5 to 1.75. >> that's very precise. >> i want basis points. >> decimal points is silly stuff, come on, joe. >> i know. >> there is positive growth, it's just not robust and the key point, it's not enough to create the jobs we need in this country. now, i argue and i argue forcefully, i'll give a speech on this tomorrow night here in new york, the reason we have so much uncertainty is not just uncertainty about europe and uncertainty about the slowdown in china, these are important things. the real uncertainty stems from what are my taxes going to be? what kind of spending pattern also come out of the federal government, how do i deal with this explosion of regulatory morass we have coming out of washington. how do you budget whether you are exxon or a little bitty 20-person company, how does the woman who runs that company or the man who runs that company budget when they have no idea what their cost
able to read that the united states is not as prepared as it should be for this type of cyber attack. >> we're not anywhere where we need to be in terms of a country with respect to preparedness and ultimately in response. the head of cyber command, general keith alexander, i think put it best when asked to evaluate one to ten where the u.s. capability is. he put it at a three. obviously this is not a very good position to be in, especially when you have a number of actors out there. china and russia are very active in terms of computer network exploit. that's espionage in cyberspace. they're increasingly integrating cyber warfare into their military planning and war fighting capabilities. these are all issues we need to take very seriously and we need to enhance our own defensive capabilities as well as invest on the offensive side as we will never firewall our way out of the problem. initiative resides with the attacker. >> is it a money issue? is it an investment of money issue in the infrastructure to combat this kind of crime? or is there something else that the united states sh
competitors to step up the game in order for mcdonald's to start missing here in the united states. what will mcdonald's force to be done? and will that be good from an investor standpoint? how much will they have to give up maybe in terms of margins in order to get those customers back, for instance? >> you know, i think it's a combination of being more aggressive on the dollar menu. they will give a little bit on the margin side and we have near term caution on that particular point. but i also think they have a pretty nice product pipeline shaping up for 2013, which gives us excitement, and it's one of the reasons why mcdonald's is one of our favorite medium term names in the space. we do have some caution based on more difficult comparisons that show up in the fourth quarter as well as the threat of higher food costs that are going to pay out early next year. >> we should point out that with 104th on the price target. jim, we hear again from r.j. about food costs. actually the flip side of this is that we have a very weak labor market in the united states. so for as long as we're not
renaissance. we're gaining market share here in the united states and the riots in china over the weekend support our notion that in the future do you want to put manufacturing facilities overseas or in the united states? this weekend is why you want to put them in the united states. >> peter, tell me what the market right now is saying to you. it would seem to me that since bernanke came out a week or so ago with the announcement of qe3 that the market has kind of moved back a little bit. we've had a few sort of down days as though the market were saying, he gave us what we expected and now it's time to get a little smart. >> it's time to get smart. the earning season could be choppy. i think a lot of people are waiting for that. actually, that's a smart move. don't think you'll see much in the next probably three weeks that will motivate anybody in either direction very seriously. i would like to say i'm a little more positive about it. i think i might be in the minority on this, but i do think we'll probably see some surprises -- >> you got the earnings season right up against the elec
that word, the auto industry of the united states at that time? >> it sounds like rhetoric. but -- and it is rhetoric, i guess, because it's words. but i think they're actually factual words. president bush and hank paulson agree because they were the first ones to provide capital to the auto industry. if the government had not stepped in, these companies would have had to literally shut their doors, they would have run out of cash, had to lay off their workers. the suppliers would have gone down. ford would have gone down. the industry would have shut down. whether it would have ultimately liquidated would depend on what would have happened after that. >> that is not the case. and in fact we got some very strong numbers earlier this week. are you surprised at the strength of auto sales at this point? >> no, i'm not surprised because you need to sell 15 million cars a year in this country simply to keep the fleet from aging. and we have not done that now for over four years. this is unprecedented in american history. so you have a huge amount of pent-up demand for cars beca
of a significant downturn in the united states economy. >> so if you have a downturn, there's a possibility that you don't have that right mix and that you could have a downturn. the odds of that are comparatively low but i worry about it because it's significant possibility. i described it as though, imagine you're on an airplane that's flying from here to los angeles, you're probably going to get there okay but if you hit an air pocket and meaning if the economy goes down, there's not an easy way to reverse it. monetary policy is less effective because when you buy a bond, when the federal reserve makes a purchase, that has the effect of giving money to somebody who won't put that money into something like that bond. and that money does not easily go to people who spend it, that's a balance between monetary and fiscal policy and i worry about the policymakers getting that balance right. that's a possibility and a scary possibility. other than that, i think the most likely situation is we will fly successfully from here to los angeles essentially but we have longer risks. you need a balanc
the united states. the only time i've ever had a break is when i was on maternity leave. i have retired from doing this one thing that i loved. now, i'm going to be able to have the time to explore something different. it's like another chapter. there's natural gas under my town. it's a game changer. ♪ it means cleaner, cheaper american-made energy. but we've got to be careful how we get it. design the wells to be safe. thousands of jobs. use the most advanced technology to protect our water. billions in the economy. at chevron, if we can't do it right, we won't do it at all. we've got to think long term. we've got to think long term. ♪ for the spender who needs a little help saving. for adding "& sons." for the dreamer, planning an early escape. for the mother of the bride. for whoever you are, for whatever you're trying to achieve, pnc has technology, guidance, and over 150 years of experience to help you get there. ♪ >>> "squawk box" keeping our eyes on the prize, its eight a "squawk" oil summit. the smartest minds in the industry. >>> safeguarding your online reputation. the founde
of the market. it is in the hands of the eflt cb not the hands of united states. >> we should point out tomorrow we will get some sort of plan or are expecting to from the ecb perhaps some details about a bond buying plan of some kind that we're hearing some things about today. the market may be disappointed in that these reports seem to indicate they'd be targeting three years and less in terms of maturity. that they would not have a yield target perhaps, say we're not going to let it go above 7%, and that it would be sterilized purchases. there are some who believe, hey, you need to actually increase the money supply. really if you're going to get things moving in europe but of course the germans are always concerned about inflation and sterilization which basically means they'll try and take in as much in deposits as they buy in bonds. sort of keeping -- >> somebody tweeted this morning fed bernanke needs to show them how you really print money. and, jim, one other facet of this report is that the head of the bach the german still remains the one lone hold out to this bond buying policy meani
. but here in the united states, with respect to the rally, i'm getting a large number of questions. we're getting a large number of questions about whether or not the stimulus boost from federal reserve easing is what it used to be, so to speak. i would remind people take a look at the last couple of instances, we've had similar measures. we've had similar instances of people wondering whether the fed was -- if i had $1 for every time we talked about the fed being out of bullets, i'd have lots of dollars. and we're going through that again. >> they would all be worth less. >> the previous dollar, yes. >> less than maybe ten years ago. not necessarily less than five years ago. >> shame on you for that populist comment there that you should be cutting taxes in europe. at what point do you think the spanish are going to cut taxes given the situation that they're in? shame on you for appealing to your republican base in such a shameless way. >> btig's clients would be interested to know that i had a republican base, but listen. at the end of the day, there isn't a sort of a one-size-fits-a
's the best case scenario. >> does allow us to focus on the united states. >> exactly. >> we're probably doing better than any economy in the world. >> you're not trying to whistle past graveyards on that front, right? you're not trying to ignore europe. >> melissa mentioned the trading perspective. i think that the traders are saying, okay, now, what do we have here, and when we look at here, well, why don't we see with the steel industry, the auto industry. we focus -- the fill lebeau interview was incredibly important where allan mull ha ly says europe, we don't have it. the truth is united states has it. 14.5 million vehicles. that is a bull market in cars. >> right. >> we are talking about this upgrade today. sun trust, why is sun trust upgraded? i think that's very significant, not just because my trust owns it, but i'm looking at sun trust saying that is, again, the housing market in the south because the federal reserve didn't like sun trust. housing, autos, retail. what else do we need? >> right. >> well, we could use china to start growing a little bit faster instead of going the oth
's happening in the united states. >> certainly that's going to bring down the large indices and i just wonder if you think in the fourth quarter there will be a put from central banks or from hedge fund managers that have to play catchup or could we look at the last three months last year? >> central banks are obviously very powerful. you know the old saying, don't fight the fed. you have to be very careful. but as you stretch out the time rise and what you find historically is there is no relationship between liquidity and stock market movement. but i think what's much more important is your original question, if the profit cycle continues to decelerate, i think that's what people want to think about and that's what people want to position their portfolios for. i still think personally that you want to look at more defensive sectors which i think are less prone to have these big earnings disappointments right now. >> rich, can you put together these two knows in the market that you want to be in more dmfticily oriented companies and also this other thought in the market that you want to be i
tarp was one of the worst economic decisions in the history of the united states. >> okay. so like i said, he does not hold back on anything he's thinking about. he will be our guest host for two hours today, and that begins at 7:00 eastern. we are also going to be talking finance with the ceo of cowen and company, jeffrey solomon, and bill isaac. plus the state of innovation, steve case will be joining us live at 7:30 eastern time. so we have a big show ahead. before we get to all of that, let's get you up to speed on the morning's headlines. andrew, good morning. >> thanks, becky. good morning to you. we will get you caught up on some of the big headlines. germany's highest court ruling that the country can ratify the new permanent european bailout fund, but there are conditions to germany's participation. here's the important part. parliament will have veto power over any future increases. we'll have more on that story in just a few moments. back here in the u.s., the fed is beginning to begin convening a two-day policy setting meeting in washington. market expectations high. many
some growth and the country is the united states. >> and we don't have the demographic. >> no, we don't. where they are selling more adult diapers than baby diapers. >> kimberly-clark. >> the aging of this country will accelerate. >> we're selling fewer baby diapers, let's be clear. there are fewer babies being born. >> right. it's a declining population as well to a certain extent and the dramatic age -- >> right. i think that our household formation was a cyclical decline related to the recession. i wouldn't be sur poised if the 1.85 children per house, i find it hard to reconcile that. it goes back to two and we see a gradual choice in housing. people were living with their mother-in-laws, and i had that experience. it's tentative. >> now you're in your car, you weren't living with your mother-in-law, you were in your car. >> live inning my car with a couple of kids and it wasn't -- an suv, that would have been an svu situation. reverse the letters. >> if everyone is debasing their currency, is anyone debasing their currency? >> that's a great question. >> a race to the bottom. >>
as well as in the united states. >> markets saying these figures point to eurozone contraction of 0.5% in qe. what's your outlook? >> it's in line with our numbers. we think for the full year the eurozone contracts at 0.4% rate, so not far off what you suggested and that seems to be consistent with the underlying data coming in. no real revisions just yet but we'll watch and wait. >> what about 2013, is that a year -- 2012 we see europe broadly contracting. what about 2013? >> a lot hinges on the global environment. hinges on whether the u.s. can slowly grow and maybe grow a bit faster. whether china can begin to pick up steam. external stories can be critical for europe. >> larry will stay with us. let's check in and check out market reaction. >> one hour into european trading session. 73 declining outpacers. ftse 100 down 1.5% yesterday. down 0.5%. dragged yesterday by u.s. disappointing. the xet ra dax down 0.3%. ibex down after a good rise in july. keep your eye on bond rates. yesterday we had a nice rally in spain on two-year. ten-year, 6.62%. that's slightly higher on the sess
of years here in the united states, no matter who's in charge. others think we're headed well down from here. how do you see it? how are you kind of playing this out? >> i really see that the u.s. has one of the most dynamic economies. a lot of entrepreneurs that can always figure out where else to take their companies. and i think this is -- we have seen that in shell gas, where shell gas went from nowhere to 50, 60, now 80 billion cubic meters of annual production. it's unbelievable. and i think this is something that, you know, we do believe in the u.s. economy in the fact that, you know, u.s. cooperations will always come up with new ways of satisfying that demand. >> andrei, thank you. >> thank you. >>> coming up, the jobs report could become a political football on the campaign trail. new england patriot president jonathan kraft will join us with a unique indicator. first, what happens when you send a conservative free market economist to the dnc with a microphone? peter shift found out and he'll join us live at 6:50 a.m. here's a little preview of that. >> how about a cap on prof
that is the united states. the diverse portfolio of high-quality stocks, income producers, and growth stocks with solid dividend boosts. and of course, some gold. these have all been the correct calls to make. i've stuck with it because i believe the europeans are not suicidal. so far, so good on that front. i believe the chinese economy will simply come back by the virtue of the fact there is still tremendous urban migration within china. i believe the accommodative stance will serve as a bridge over a troubled fiscal cliff and will not take us down. at the same time, the fed's stance will continue to make higher dividend-paying companies in to gems that will all speak as a way to generate income. we'll continue to want to buy the stocks of cash-rich countries with yields that well exceed treasuries. and yes, we're going to want to own a lot of gold, specifically because there isn't a nation that doesn't want its currency lower in order to spur growth. you need a real reserve currency, not the dollar, and that reserve currency is gold. also not to toot my own horn too hard, but throughout t
by examining 113 indicators from official data sources and polling 15,000 executives. united states continued a four-year slide to the seventh spot. separately, a judge ruling amr can abandon its pilot's union contract. saying the bankrupt parent of american airlines corrected certain issues that caused him to reject the same request in the past. amr is trying to save more than $1 billion a year in labor costs. it can unilaterally impose work terms on its pilot, all is happening as talks between amr and u.s. air continue. >>> in the meantime, a very complicated story. we've been trying to follow the twists and turns. the fbi now says there is no evidence to support claims that hacking group anonymous infiltrated an fbi agent's laptop and lifted data for more than 12 million apple products. however the front page of "the financial times" lays it out and says hackers embarrass apple with this data release. there were over a million different devices, numbers were published online. this is a story that has many odd twists. the hackers said they would not give any interviews about this breach unt
economic growth in the united states. you talk about it all the time on cnbc. you have policy people on. but really what we need to do is get government out of the way. this entrepreneur thing happens on its own by its own volition as long as tax policy is correct. that's what they were talking about. you get situations like entrepreneurs that become very successful, fror instance, zuckerberg and some of the millionaires he's created are splitting off and investing their own. they don't just sit on their cash, buy a yacht and sail around the world. >> why is one of the big platforms of this election that very issue regarding tax policy? it seems so self-evident to people we rub shoulders with on this trading floor but not to the population at large. >> they think it's gets muddied. if you talk about the capital gains tax. there was a guest on earlier today that says, what's it mean to somebody making $50,000? lowering the capital gains tax to somebody like that is the most important thing you can do because corporations are going to create jobs. people invest in start-ups that can creat
has been happening this morning? those viewers in the united states waking up, why are the apple workers in paris upset? >> for the last week, they've been extremely it is grunt he willed. all over the french media, they've been meeting with different management, complaining, in pact one of them was quoted as saying working at apple is like working in a coal mine. they've been complaining that they have to work longer hours than what they're paid for, that they don't get any commissions uneven though they're under constant pressure to sell. they're monitored by cameras in the stores and looking for things like a 13th month of pay as a bonus, higher pay and water fountains in the store. some of these things are standards for french workers, but they're complaining that apple has been extremely resistant to provide them these things. in fact they say they've been fighting for three years for the 13th month of pay. so at the end of yesterday, there was a sort of last resort meeting at which it was decided that these issues would be revisited before the end of the year, that the comp
in the united states. maybe you do own them. >> do you know who has heard of them? >> who? >> jim cramer. >> the deal is worth approximately $35.75 a share. i don't know what type of medical devices they make. you know, i like a lot of things. i don't mind seeing toys made in china, that's fine, that's good. my defibrillator, maybe not. >> there are problems with defibrillators made here. >> that's true. my 737, no. >> no? >> you fly around on chinese airplanes? >> the iphone. the iphone doesn't crash. >> chinese car if you lock your keys in them, you get a can opener and you can easily break into your car like a lunar landing module, you put your elbow right through it if you -- >> what do you want me to say? >> that amazon is planning an online marketplace? >> amazon is planning an online market place for wine sales, the second attempt to sell wines to consumers after a partner problem forced them to end the first one three years ago. they held a workshop in napa this week with members of the napa valley vintners association. they are planning to charge wineries a 15% commission on sal
a month or so and you see iron ore stocks, you see machinery stocks in the united states and other parts of the world rally off the back of this notion of china stimulus, are all those things built on false expectations? >> we need to look at those charts. and most of those charts have fallen very sharply in the last two months. so what we experience through our trading book on friday with short coverings, we didn't see long-only investors coming in and buying stocks this morning. what i do think is different and you've highlighted that asia has recovered -- talking about a recovery -- the local investors do seem to be more excited by this new story than we've seen for some period of time. particularly noting that cement stocks rallied quite hard today in shanghai. so that is interesting that the local investors are somewhat more enthused about this story than we've seen for months. >> okay. adrian, thank you so much for phoning in. we appreciate it. adrian mowat of jpmorgan. >>> it's interesting this morning that stocks are essentially hanging on to the sharp gains that they made last w
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